Transgressive

0010 - Juneteenth

June 21, 2021 Tananda D.
Transgressive
0010 - Juneteenth
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This week we discuss the newly official, but 200+ year old holiday of Juneteenth which marks the end of Slavery and one of the darkest chapters in American history, and we discuss the ongoing struggle for equality. We also relate parallels in the the struggle for LGBTQIA+  rights to the need to continue to fight against discrimination against all marginalized people.

We can be found at www.transgressive.net. We can be reached via email at [email protected] We can be found on Twitter @transgressive21 and on www.facebook.com/transgressive.podcast

Speaker 1:

Just this last week on June 17th, 2021, president Biden signed into law, Juneteenth national insurance , and

Speaker 2:

Stay commemorating the anniversary of June 19th, 1865. When union army general Gordon Granger announced general order. Number three, this order officially put an end to legalized slavery in the United States. Let's talk about Juneteenth. You're listening to

Speaker 3:

Transgressive a podcast about gender identity, LGBTQ and social justice issues .

Speaker 1:

Some regular listeners may note that this is a departure from our usual focus on LGBTQ issues. However, wider issues of social justice are incredibly important to all marginalized people. And so I thought it was appropriate to bring intersectionality front and center today. Celebrations of Juneteenth also known as Jubilee day, black independence day or emancipation day. Date back all the way to 1866. As I related in the opener, the celebration commemorates the reading of general order three by union army general Gordon Granger on June 19th, 1865. The order says in part,

Speaker 4:

People of Texas are informed that in accordance with a proclamation from the executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights and property between former masters and slaves. And the connection here to for existing between them becomes that between employer and hired laborer.

Speaker 1:

This is a joyous celebration of the official end of one of the darkest arrows in American history, but it is also a somber one. As we reflect that the struggles for justice and equality are still very much ongoing. The emancipation proclamation Granger's Juneteenth orders. These were significant and important, but the post civil war reformation and the following Jim Crow era, the struggles for equality during the civil rights movement far too many people will sit back comfortably in their Monday morning quarterback armchair and say, Hey, that's all in the past. Yet. These very real struggles against racism and bigotry are ongoing. Even as president Biden signed the order to enact Juneteenth as a national holiday, very states have been pushing legislation to prevent or restrict teaching about racism and racial inequality in schools. There are still school curriculums, which refer to the slave trade in whitewash terms, such as the triangle trade and conveniently leave out the literal enslavement of millions, general order three may have officially ended slavery, but racism and inequality are still pervading our society over 200 years later, the very same Republican party that I have railed against in other episodes, their anti-trans laws are actively working to push anti voting rights laws, to disenfranchise people of color using every dirty trick in the book in order to try and keep people of color from voting and having their voices heard. It just so happens that the month of June is also pride month, okay. To Nanda. And where are you going with this one? I hear you asking, and I'm glad you asked you, see if you're LGBTQ than your rights to express your sexuality freely your rights to marry your rights, to transition those things you owe in part to the actions of women of color, several of them, trans women of color, the Stonewall riot New York in 1969 is perhaps the pivotal moment that marks the beginning of the gay rights movement, which today we would think of as LGBTQ rights movement. If you identify anywhere on that spectrum, you have Marsha P Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, Ms . Major Griffin, Gracie , and stormy [inaudible] pardon my pronunciation. You have these women of color to thank the fight for civil rights for black indigenous and people of color, as well as for LGBTQ individuals continues to this day and will continue for some time to come. I am not a person of color, but I strive to be an ally. I strive to stand up and say that I see parallels between the struggle for racial justice and the struggles for my own freedoms to stand proud as a lesbian and as a trans woman, the right to live without harassment, without discrimination, without being dehumanized. That right belongs to everyone. And as a trans woman, but not a person of color, I feel it is absolutely imperative for me to stand up and say, happy and proud Juneteenth. Please let us not forget what a very long road it has been and not ignore the very real and difficult work that continues to lie ahead of us all for the struggle of racial equality and social justice.

Speaker 3:

Our website is www.transgressive.net. You can reach out to [email protected] . We can also be reached at Twitter at transgressive 21. Please consider leaving a five star review on your favorite podcast platform. I'm Nanda , and this was transgressive.

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Juneteenth
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